Teachers in Transition

Teachers in Transition - Episode 122 - The Importance of Routines in Managing Stress

July 26, 2021 Kitty Boitnott
Teachers in Transition
Teachers in Transition - Episode 122 - The Importance of Routines in Managing Stress
Show Notes Transcript

In this week's episode, Kitty talks about the importance of establishing and maintaining routines. You need a morning routine whether it includes exercise, meditation, or a morning reading to set the tone for the rest of the day. Likewise, you need an evening routine around getting ready for bedtime so you can signal to your brain that it is time to go to sleep.

To hear more about what Kitty has to say, listen in. To ask questions or offer suggestions for future episodes, email Kitty at [email protected]

To learn more about Kitty and her services, check out https://teachersintransition.com.

Speaker 1:

Are you a teacher who's feeling stressed out and overwhelmed. Do you worry that you're feeling symptoms of burnout or are you sure you've already gotten there? Have you started to dream of doing some other kind of job or perhaps pursuing a whole different career, but you don't know what else you're even qualified to do. You don't know how to start a job search. You just feel stuck. If that sounds like you, I promise you're not alone. My name is kitty Boitnott. I'm a career transition and job search coach. And I specialize in helping burn out teachers. Just like you deal, not only with the stress and overwhelm of your day-to-day job, but to consider what other careers might be out there waiting for you. Join me for teachers in transition. In some episodes, I'll be speaking to stress management techniques and how you can manage your stress on a day to day basis. In other episodes, I'll be talking about career transition. What tools do you need to be successful in a job search when you're moving from one career into a totally different track. These are questions that you need answers to, and I can help you find those answers. My name is kitty . Boitnott welcome to teachers and transition.

Speaker 2:

Welcome back to episode 122 of teachers in transition the podcast and the YouTube channel. My name is kitty Boitnott . I am the owner of Boitnott coaching, LLC, and the founder of teachers in transition. I specialize in helping burn out teachers who are ready to make a career change, and I help them by helping them find new careers and new ways to go about their job search so that they can be more successful. Avoid the mistakes that most job seekers make and find their new job or career sooner rather than later, I'm also a certified stress management coach. And if you've listened to this podcast before you know that I alternate topics each week, one week talking about stress and stress management strategies and on alternating weeks, talking about career transition strategies and techniques and tips this week, we're talking about stress. And what I want to suggest to you this week is the importance of a routine to help you to not eliminate, because there's no way we can ever eliminate stress in our lives, but having a routine in the morning and in the evening can help tremendously in managing stress throughout the rest of your day. If you don't have to consider what time to get up, what is it that you have to do before you are ready to leave the house? What is it that you need to do in order to be ready for your day? If, if all of that is already predetermined the time you're going to get up the activities that you do , uh, before you start to engage in work, do you go for a run? Do you sit meditate? Do you do a daily reading? What is it that you want to do to help set the tone and get your day off too ? A good start. It will be different for each person, but if you have an established routine, you eliminate a number of decisions right off the bat, as far as what to have for breakfast and what time to get the kids up. And what time, like I said, leave the house. All of those things are already predetermined. And if you have a routine and you can manage to stick to your routine, you'll be amazed at how much time and , and mental energy is freed up because those basic decisions have already been made. You can think about much more important yeah . Things. And you can think on a deeper level. Yeah . And if you started off your day with a run or some sort of exercise or a meditation or a reading that helps to set you a and a grounded place, your day is likely to get go much, much smoother. The same is true for bedtime. You know , we need to establish a bedtime routine. Now I don't often mention it, but I am also a trained and certified sleep science coach . And it's I so incredibly important for us to understand that this whole idea that we can defer and delays sleep is a myth. You can get away with it when you're young, like in your twenties, but when you're a child, you need a sleep routine. I need to have a set time when you're going to go to bed, you need to go through a ritual of sorts to S to send to your brain, the signal that it is time to retire for the evening. And that means turning off the TV at a set time, perhaps doing some quiet reading, to help settle your mind and , and, and get yourself into the groove of getting ready for bed, putting off on your pajamas, brushing your teeth. If you need a bath before bedtime doing that, taking care of that. And then having a particular set time where you're going to be in the bed and ready to turn off the lights. It's a really good idea to eliminate the use of screens in the evening, and to turn off the TV early enough, that whatever stimulation you experienced from watching a television program, that you have a chance to settle yourself and move on to something more soothing or more relaxing. These things are important because the routine, the ritual of getting ready, ready for bedtime. As I mentioned earlier, it sends a signal to your brain. It's time to go to bed. You know, our brains get mixed up. Sometimes when we're in artificial light in the evening, back in the, in the old days before we had electricity, before we were able to stay up till any time of the night or day that we wanted to, when it got dark, people went to bed. They, even if they had candles or, or, or lamps, they eventually turned those off and went to bed at an early hour relative to what a lot of people think of as a bedtime hour in our modern day, likewise, they got up when it got sunlight, they had chores to take care of animals, to tend to, you know, back in the day when I was growing up, my grandmother managed a dairy farm and she was up at five o'clock every single morning and out the door to gather the cows together, to get them ready to milk. And she took care of dumping the milk into the container. I was thinking about her just the other day. She was only four foot 11 and how she was ever able to manage those big, old milk cans and get them lifted up and into the milk containers for the milk truck to come and drain. I don't know. I just took it for granted that she was able to do it because she did it every day and she did it until she turned 65 in the morning. And in the evening, she would have out five o'clock in the afternoon to gather the cows together into the milk barn where she would milk the cows. And it was a twice a day routine. And farm routine is very similar to the day and night routine of the, of the day and night cycles . So the point is that with electricity, we're able to trick our brains into thinking that it's daylight longer. And the upside of that is that we can do things well into the evening that we ordinarily wouldn't be able to do. If we didn't have the luxury of electrical lighting, the downside is that because our brains are hardwired for the circadian rhythm, it can get messed up and it can, it can get confused. And it's harder then to go to sleep at night, it's harder to get a good nights , restful sleep. You not only need a certain quantity of sleep. You need a good quality of sleep, which means you want to go to bed early enough that you can get the amount of sleepy need, but you want to also sleep all the way through the night avoiding the two o'clock three, o'clock wake up that some people experience a lot of people, frankly, experience. And the more you can get into a bedtime routine, the more you create the atmosphere for a restful night's sleep so that you don't have to worry about waking up at two or three o'clock in the morning. So routine is the thing that the day you need a morning routine, you need an evening routine. And I promise you, if you can manage to create a routine for the morning in the evening and stick to it, you will find yourself less stressed throughout the rest of the day. That's my offering for this week. I hope it was helpful. And I hope you'll come back. If you have any questions as always email [email protected] and let me know what questions you may have or what other topics you might like for me to cover. And I'll see you again next week, have a wonderful week.

Speaker 1:

So there you have it, an episode of teachers in transition. I hope you enjoy the information and I hope you'll plan to come back. Please subscribe to teachers in transition so that you can be alerted of future episodes. And let me know if you have any questions or topics that you would like me to specifically cover in a future episode, I'm more than happy to help with individual questions as well. So email me at kitty Boitnott at boys , not coaching.com. If you are interested in finding a new career or just enjoying your life more, this is the place to start. I'm kitty Boitnott . And this is teachers in transition.